Cinematic Gems on Freeview

Posted December 2, 2016 - Blog Posts,News and Blog

It’s no secret our TVs are rife with mesmerising nature shows, celebrities either pirouetting or indulging in crunchy witchetty-grubs, or boardrooms full of budding entrepreneurs. We’re not saying these aren’t delights in themselves- but we’re here to shake your schedules up. We’ve rounded up some cinematic gems on Freeview this weekend- a welcome change of pace.



The Fly (1986)

Saturday 3 December – 00:00 -0 2:00
Quest

Be afraid, be very afraid. Jeff Goldblum plays a doomed scientist experimenting with the ever fascinating notion of teleportation. However, when a rogue house fly is trapped in the pod, his own body is fused with the minute creature. With a science reporter’s heart to win over, this gothic horror isn’t just stomach-churning- expect a trip to heartbreak hotel.

 



WarGames (1983)

Saturday 3 December – 00:15 – 02:10
Movie Mix

Is WarGames the definitive film that legitimised hacker culture? A young Matthew Broderick spends his time like any other teen- locked in his bedroom transfixed to the computer. Longing to play the latest games, he strikes gold and hacks a system he thinks will give him that. What looks like an innocent war game turns out to be the backdoor to Pentagon’s network- leaving the teen threatening World War III the longer he plays.



iLL Manors (2012)

Sunday 4 December – 00:15 – 02:10
BBC Two

Are you sitting comfortably? – Plan B’s (Ben Drew) opening line to the film he both wrote and directed. Follow the harrowing depiction of East London, as real issues you’ve undoubtedly read about in The Metro, are brought to life.  The film is scored throughout with Plan B’s own album ‘Ill Manors’, a perfect accompaniment to the gritty storyline.



Django (1966)

Sunday 4 December – 00:35 – 02:20
Movies4Men

Django- the quintessential Spaghetti Western as well as Tarantino’s inspiration for Django Unchained- the award grabbing film of 2013. Trekking barren wastelands, escaping Mexican bandits and rescuing harlot’s- all in a day’s work for the genre-defining Django.

Despite being armed with all the necessary clichés that make this genre so great, it depicts a level of cinematic violence that wasn’t present in most films of its time, leaving the film banned several countries for decades.

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